The Leader as Coach

Historically, managers came up through the ranks and knew what needed to be done, taught others how to do it, and managed their performance. It was command and control.

Today, change and disruption are constant, and what worked in the past does not predict success for the future. Modern managers don’t have all the answers, and this new reality changes how managers and leaders interact with their teams. Prescriptive instruction is replaced by guidance and support. Employees learn to adapt to a constantly changing environment in ways that release fresh energy, innovation, and commitment.

The role of manager is becoming that of a coach.

This is a fundamental shift as more organizations invest in training leaders as coaches. This coaching in ongoing and executed by managers inside the organization rather than consultants; it creates a true learning organization, and it helps define the culture and advance the mission. It’s work that all managers should engage in with all their people all the time, in ways that help define the organization’s culture and advance its mission. An effective manager-as-coach asks questions instead of providing answers, supports employees instead of judging them, and facilitates their development instead of dictating what has to be done.

Skilled coaching involves unlocking people’s potential to maximize their own performance. Coaching at its best imparts knowledge and helps others discover it themselves.

Aspiration and practice are most often not in alignment. Let’s focus first on  focus first on how to develop coaching as an individual managerial capacity, and then on how to make it an organizational one.

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Coaching feels to touchy feely for some leaders. They may feel uncomfortable outside the familiar authority.

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